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sábado, 28 de noviembre de 2015

Another Earth, Is it Possible?


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Another Earth, Is it Possible?

5 Reasons We May Live in a Multiverse
by Clara Moskowitz, SPACE.com Assistant Managing Editor 

Hi, dear friends and followers. Today I would like to share with you on a topic that has been ongoing for at least the past century. Are there parallel universes, or universes in different dimensions in time and space? If there are, then the likelihood of another world or worlds that also cradle life on them are quite likely. Actually, the chances of it increase.
Thank you, dear friends, for visiting and reading my blog


Conceptualization of a multiverse
Pin It Our universe may be one of many, physicists say.
Credit: Shutterstock/Victor Habbick
The universe we live in may not be the only one out there. In fact, our universe could be just one of an infinite number of universes making up a "multiverse."

Though the concept may stretch credulity, there's good physics behind it. And there's not just one way to get to a multiverse — numerous physics theories independently point to such a conclusion. In fact, some experts think the existence of hidden universes is more likely than not.

Here are the five most plausible scientific theories suggesting we live in a multiverse:

1. Infinite Universes
Scientists can't be sure what the shape of space-time is, but most likely, it's flat (as opposed to spherical or even donut-shape) and stretches out infinitely. But if space-time goes on forever, then it must start repeating at some point, because there are a finite number of ways particles can be arranged in space and time.

So if you look far enough, you would encounter another version of you — in fact, infinite versions of you. Some of these twins will be doing exactly what you're doing right now, while others will have worn a different sweater this morning, and still others will have made vastly different career and life choices.

Because the observable universe extends only as far as light has had a chance to get in the 13.7 billion years since the Big Bang (that would be 13.7 billion light-years), the space-time beyond that distance can be considered to be its own separate universe. In this way, a multitude of universes exists next to each other in a giant patchwork quilt of universes. [Visualizations of Infinity: A Gallery]
Space-time may stretch out to infinity. If so, then everything in our universe is bound to repeat at some point, creating a patchwork quilt of infinite universes.

Note: In my opinion the multiple verses would not just stretch out on a flat plane in all directions into infinity like it is illustrated here. But also in layers one on top of the other like the pages in a telephone book going infinitely up and down as well.

2. Bubble Universes
In addition to the multiple universes created by infinitely extending space-time, other universes could arise from a theory called "eternal inflation." Inflation is the notion that the universe expanded rapidly after the Big Bang, in effect inflating like a balloon. Eternal inflation, first proposed by Tufts University cosmologist Alexander Vilenkin, suggests that some pockets of space stop inflating, while other regions continue to inflate, thus giving rise to many isolated "bubble universes."
Thus, our own universe, where inflation has ended, allowing stars and galaxies to form, is but a small bubble in a vast sea of space, some of which is still inflating, that contains many other bubbles like ours. And in some of these bubble universes, the laws of physics and fundamental constants might be different than in ours, making some universes strange places indeed.

3. Parallel Universes
Another idea that arises from string theory is the notion of "braneworlds" — parallel universes that hover just out of reach of our own, proposed by Princeton University's Paul Steinhardt and Neil Turok of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Ontario, Canada. The idea comes from the possibility of many more dimensions to our world than the three of space and one of time that we know. In addition to our own three-dimensional "brane" of space, other three-dimensional branes may float in a higher-dimensional space.
parallel univeres illustration
Our universe may live on one membrane, or "brane" that is parallel to many others containing their own universes, all floating in a higher-dimensional space.

Credit: Shutterstock/Sandy MacKenzieView full size image
Columbia University physicist Brian Greene describes the idea as the notion that "our universe is one of potentially numerous 'slabs' floating in a higher-dimensional space, much like a slice of bread within a grander cosmic loaf," in his book "The Hidden Reality" (Vintage Books, 2011).

A further wrinkle on this theory suggests these brane universes aren't always parallel and out of reach. Sometimes, they might slam into each other, causing repeated Big Bangs that reset the universes over and over again. [The Universe: Big Bang to Now in 10 Easy Steps ]

4. Daughter Universes
The theory of quantum mechanics, which reigns over the tiny world of subatomic particles, suggests another way multiple universes might arise. Quantum mechanics describes the world in terms of probabilities, rather than definite outcomes. And the mathematics of this theory might suggest that all possible outcomes of a situation do occur — in their own separate universes. For example, if you reach a crossroads where you can go right or left, the present universe gives rise to two daughter universes: one in which you go right, and one in which you go left.

"And in each universe, there's a copy of you witnessing one or the other outcome, thinking — incorrectly — that your reality is the only reality," Greene wrote in "The Hidden Reality."

5. Mathematical Universes
Scientists have debated whether mathematics is simply a useful tool for describing the universe, or whether math itself is the fundamental reality, and our observations of the universe are just imperfect perceptions of its true mathematical nature. If the latter is the case, then perhaps the particular mathematical structure that makes up our universe isn't the only option, and in fact all possible mathematical structures exist as their own separate universes.


"A mathematical structure is something that you can describe in a way that's completely independent of human baggage," said Max Tegmark of MIT, who proposed this brain-twistin gidea. "I really believe that there is this universe out there that can exist independently of me that would continue to exist even if there were no humans."
Thank you very much again, dear friends, for visiting my blog. Please share your thoughts with us, if you will. Have a great day. 

ڰۣIn Loving Light from the Fairy Ladyڰۣ


6 comentarios:

  1. An article with a very interesting topic, with questions that man has always wanted to respond LIKE ..thank share Cindy , happy weekend precious kisses

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    Respuestas
    1. Muchas gracias por compartir sus pensamientos fo María. Yo sí creo que hay vida en otros lugares que aquí. En el infinito, hay infinito potencialidades de. Tienen un maravilloso fin de semana Maria

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  2. Wow! Five possibilities to describe the multiverses and all can turn your head inside out, especially #5! Can you imagine every mathematical structure, or expression, describing its own universe? This goes beyond infinite in number and goes towards inconceivable!

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  3. Una entrada maravillosa muy interesante las teorías gracias cindy feliz fin de semana gracias

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  4. Muchas gracias por compartir sus pensamientos querido amigo +Isidro.

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  5. Not conceivable with numbers only numbers without end. I don't think of terms of numbers only in terms of immense is all I have to picture in my head. Like a place with no horizon.Thanks Paula for sharing your thoughts

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